The location and size of a mole may cause cosmetic concerns, as well as physical irritation. For instance, if a mole exists on a certain part of the neck, it may become caught in a necklace, causing discomfort and sometimes bleeding. We think these are good reasons to seek cosmetic mole removal, and we are happy to help you feel more comfortable and more satisfied with your appearance. More than just removing moles for cosmetic reasons, our team ensures that we evaluate all moles before removal to rule out abnormalities that may indicate skin cancer.
Common skin diseases and conditions There are dozens of conditions that affect someone's skin, and it can be hard to tell one from the other. This article tells you about about permanent skin diseases, temporary skin diseases, internal skin diseases, and skin diseases for different age groups, including children. Learn everything you need to know here. Read now
Been getting rid of overgrown, strange and poorly positioned moles one by one. Works! On my neck, where there’s multiple, small moles I have used this as an all-over treatment with success, too. Still working on it, but great reductions already. Would probably be quicker if I were more consistent, but still working, just slow. (Dark moles generally turn light after a few applications). * - Theresa

Create a mixture of four to six drops of coconut oil and two to three drops of oregano oil and apply this directly to your skin tag three times a day. This should dry out the skin tag so that it falls off on its own. Make sure to always use a carrier oil to dilute the oregano oil or else you risk redness and irritation. This oil also must never be used near your eyes.


Except for the cosmetic appearance, skin tags generally cause no physical pain or discomfort. These tiny skin growths generally cause symptoms when they are repeatedly irritated (for example, by the collar or in the groin). Cosmetic reasons are the most common reason for skin tag removal. The following symptoms and signs may necessitate skin tag removal:
This method may be the most effective method to remove skin tags, but you should not do this method at home. Cutting or scratching the skin tag off yourself is dangerous. It leaves you susceptible to infections and if done incorrectly can cause excessive bleeding. If you are interested in having a skin tag cut off, see a doctor to do the procedure safely.

A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the American Accreditation HealthCare Commission (www.urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows rigorous standards of quality and accountability. A.D.A.M. is among the first to achieve this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial policy, editorial process and privacy policy. A.D.A.M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www.hon.ch).

"If the skin tags are a little bigger or they have more of a thicker stalk at the bottom, then I like to just do a miniature injection of lidocaine to numb the skin and just snip them right off with some very sharp sterile scissors. It only takes a second to do," says Geraghty. "Even with that method I usually do a little bit of cautery after to burn the base because these skin tags have their own blood vessel supply. Burning the base also puts a little scab on it."
Most people choose to remove them for cosmetic reasons, especially skin tags that surface on the neck, eyelid, or face. In rare cases, a skin tag can get irritated and infected. In that case, skin tag removal is the best course of action to prevent infection from reoccurring. But, what causes them? And once you have them, you need to know how to get rid of skin tags. We’ll explain it all.
If you had stitches, your doctor will recommend that for a few days you keep the area as dry as possible and avoid doing any heavy exercise, Dr. Conrad says. (Both of these factors can throw a wrench into things if you’re super active—be sure to discuss that with your doctor if it worries you.) If you had a pretty quick and easy removal, you should be fine to return to any usual habits like working out the next day, but it’s still smart to run that by your doctor first.
Your dermatologist may become concerned if one of your moles has changed shape or color, as this may be an indicator of skin cancer. Most moles are less than a ¼-inch in size, so any mole that is larger should be checked by your doctor. Identifying and treating skin cancers early helps avoid spreading of the cancerous cells to other parts of the body. Uncommon moles, also called dysplastic nevi, may:
Some doctors said skin tags wouldn’t grow. Some told me they would keep growing. Most of them said they would increase in frequency as a person ages, and sure enough, what did I find over my eyelid the other day — a tiny little skin tag, just where the lid rubs against my brow. For cosmetic reasons, I’d consider getting that one removed, though the thought of liquid nitrogen on that thin skin makes me shudder, as do the aesthetics of a giant Band-Aid on my face for days.
Recognize the benefits of professional medical care. It is very tempting to treat skin tags at home, but your doctor’s care offers some unique benefits. They will use sterile instruments to prevent infection. They will also rub on numbing cream to reduce your pain during and after the procedure. In addition, some of the methods, such as cauterization, are so advanced that they rarely leave a noticeable scar.[7]
Most moles are unnoticeable and do not require removal. Obvious moles that are dark, bumpy or just simply irritating, are the ones primarily considered for removal. Those who are conscious about how they look may consider this quick cosmetic enhancement. Healthwise, any mole that changes in appearance, must be promptly checked to ensure that it is not cancerous.
We use cookies and similar technologies to improve your browsing experience, personalize content and offers, show targeted ads, analyze traffic, and better understand you. We may share your information with third-party partners for marketing purposes. To learn more and make choices about data use, visit our Advertising Policy and Privacy Policy. By clicking “Accept and Continue” below, (1) you consent to these activities unless and until you withdraw your consent using our rights request form, and (2) you consent to allow your data to be transferred, processed, and stored in the United States.
×