If you notice a growth on your skin, don't assume it's a skin tag right away. Check with a doctor first, as it can signify a more severe condition. If the growth is confirmed to be a skin tag and you want to remove it manually, sterilize your tools and check for any allergic reactions first, particularly if applying essential oils. If home remedies don't work, you may visit a dermatologist as a last resort.
Create a mixture of four to six drops of coconut oil and two to three drops of oregano oil and apply this directly to your skin tag three times a day. This should dry out the skin tag so that it falls off on its own. Make sure to always use a carrier oil to dilute the oregano oil or else you risk redness and irritation. This oil also must never be used near your eyes.
Skin tags, medically known as acrochordons, are soft, skin colored flaps of skin that extend out from various parts on your body. They generally do not cause pain unless rubbed frequently or twisted, and are not a medical threat. Most doctors advise to leave skin tags alone unless you are intent on removing them. If you would like to remove your skin tags, you can visit your doctor’s office to discuss your options. You can also apply natural oils or mixtures to your tag in the hopes of drying it out until it eventually falls off. If you have a growth that is too firm to wiggle, is a different color than your surrounding skin, has raw or bleeding areas, or causes you pain, consult with your doctor immediately to determine if the growth is more critical than a skin tag.[1]
Which skin conditions occur during pregnancy? Some common skin conditions can affect women during pregnancy, including hyperpigmentation, stretch marks and skin tags. These may be due to physical or hormonal changes. Some will disappear after pregnancy, but others, such as stretch marks, may remain. Topical creams may help, but check with a doctor before use. Read now
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