The first mole I used this on went away in 2 weeks. I Soaked a qtip and held it there for a minute 3 times a day. You won’t think it’s working but suddenly one day the mole is itchy and it gets gummy and crumbles off. I next tried it on a clear mole on my nose Ive had for 35 years. It took the same qtip method but this one took over a month - it got itchy and I rubbed it and it peeled off. I am so happy! I went through 2 large bottles but it is cheaper than a doctor and I have no scarring. * - Mindy
This method may be the most effective method to remove skin tags, but you should not do this method at home. Cutting or scratching the skin tag off yourself is dangerous. It leaves you susceptible to infections and if done incorrectly can cause excessive bleeding. If you are interested in having a skin tag cut off, see a doctor to do the procedure safely.

The medical information provided in this site is for educational purposes only and is the property of the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice and shall not create a physician - patient relationship. If you have a specific question or concern about a skin lesion or disease, please consult a dermatologist. Any use, re-creation, dissemination, forwarding or copying of this information is strictly prohibited unless expressed written permission is given by the American Osteopathic College of Dermatology.


Skin tags are small, usually measured in millimeters, but can grow to a half-inch in length. A skin tag may start to develop without you’re even noticing. Once formed, they typically don’t get any bigger. They can show up virtually anywhere on the body, but are most often on the eyelids, the neck, the groin area, and in the armpits — basically on areas of the body with folds. You may have just one or two or many, and they might be in isolated spots or in a group with many skin tags.
More than half if not all of the general population has been reported to have skin tags at some time in their lives. Although tags are generally acquired (not present at birth) and may occur in anyone, more often they arise in adulthood. They are much more common in middle age, and they tend to increase in prevalence up to age 60. Children and toddlers may also develop skin tags, particularly in the underarm and neck areas. Skin tags are more common in overweight people.
With smaller nevi, the growth is cut or ‘shaved’ off flush with the skin with a scalpel or surgical scissors,while larger moles may require cutting out and stitching of wound edges. Very large nevi may call for gradual removal, in which case your physician will remove a little more at each appointment until the entire growth is removed. This is a more serious procedure, calling for a skin graft from another part of the body.
Don’t all of us want a smooth skin with no marks or abnormalities? If your skin is smooth to the look and the touch, you will feel very content and confident, as people with skin conditions tend to feel unconfident about them. Unfortunately, some people have to suffer some of the skin conditions, and one of them is skin tags. Do you know what they are? Do you know if you have them? Are skin tags dangerous and how to get rid of skin tags?
Back in the 1980s, there was some speculation that skin tags were more common in people who went on to develop colon polyps or colon cancer. Subsequent research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine and the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, however, found no association. That means people with skin tags had no greater chance of developing colon polyps or cancer. The authors concluded skin tags should not be used as a reason for more intensive screening.

I like how the H-Moles Formula offers a mixture of essential oils, and since I have very sensitive skin, it doesn't cause any rashes or blemishes on my face, which is a good thing. I been applying it with my finger to the flat moles on my face for a few weeks now but still haven't seen any improvements yet. I am hoping it will help so we'll see! * - Justin


The cost of mole removal varies for several reasons. If the mole is of concern due to changes in colour, texture, diameter or the border (edges), this may be covered by Provincial Healthcare (in Canada). If this is the case, speak to your Family Doctor to see if he or she is concerned at all and wants you to see a Dermatologist for assessment. They will refer you and the treatment may be covered. If it strictly for cosmetic purposes that you want it removed, the cost varies based on location of the mole, if it's raised or flat, skin tag or actual mole. Just to give you an idea, it may be anywhere from $200 - $500. This will also vary based on your geographical area. The technique used to remove it may be cautery, shave or excision. Good luck and I hope this answer helps.
The implications of this differentiation help someone understand whether mole removal is covered by health insurance. So, cosmetic removal or removal of a mole because it is unsighly is not medically necessary and insurance will not cover this whereas insurance will cover the suspicious appearing mole. Regardless, the cost of mole removal will vary anywhere from $100 to $500 based upon size, location and shape.
I'm one of those people who don't think much of natural remedies. If a pill or a shot will handle whatever ailment I've got I'll take it. Against my nature, I decided to give this product a shot to clear up severe toenail fungus on both of my big toes. Wow am I impressed! Used in conjunction with a tree tea oil soap in the shower, this stuff began eating away the fungus within 2-3 weeks while leaving the healthy part of the nail alone. After 6 weeks I'm almost completely fungus free. I've been saturating the nail every night and sometimes 2x a day. Best results after filing down infected area and then applying oil. Highly recommend this product.

These small (often) flesh-colored benign growths can develop anywhere on the face or body. And both men and women (of all ethnicities) are vulnerable to the condition. You may not even be aware that you have skin tags. The problems begin when they’re easy to see, form in a cluster or they grow in size. They can also become irritated, infected or blood-filled.

In order to determine the exact cost of your treatment, we invite guests to schedule an appointment so that we can develop a personalized treatment plan that will satisfy both your health and cosmetic goals. Once a treatment plan is determined, we will be able to provide a clear breakdown of costs. To make our services accessible to those who need them, we offer flexible financing and payment options. We also accept insurance when applicable.
There are so many uses for Tea Tree Oil, and this bottling and eye dropper that comes with this one makes it so easy to use. The eye dropper actually screws into the top of the bottle and can replace the lid. I have no doubt this bottle will last me forever as it is 4oz and you only need one to two drops each time you use it. You can use Tea Tree oil for everything from acne, to minor scrapes and burns, to help with athlete's foot and even nail infections. I have heard you can even use it for things like lice and herpes. I got it for use on my acne, as I have suffered from acne since I was a teen. Just a little dab helps to keep it clean and to help keep the acne from spreading more. product was purchased at a discount ... full review
I had a large, flat mole on my back. I started using H Moles 3x a day. It took almost 4 months-but I only used less then 2 small bottles. It is completely GONE with NO SCAR! If I had used a stronger mole remover that works quickly-there would have been a crater scar. Flat moles need this product. Don't give up...even if it is taking awhile. You WILL get results. Fabulous product!! * - Andrea
I never knew what skin tags were until about 10 years ago. They’re annoying more than anything, but I know some people who are very concerned when they have them (even if they’ve gone to the doctor and been cleared). Good to see there are a number of home remedies. Not surprised to see apple cider vinegar listed as a possible solution. If ever nature produced a universal elixir, that would be it.
I had a fairly large mole on the side of my head next to and above the ear, along where glasses frame would set. I had my Dr. look at it and he said it wasn't the type of mole to worry about and if it caused an issue and I wanted it off he would cut or burn it off. In the last few months it began to grow and had reached the size of a penny and about 1/4" thick, so I thought it was time to have it removed. I was very skeptical about D-Mole however I don't trust Dr. much either so I thought I'd give it a try. Well in about 10 days or so it begin to come off in small pieces like a scab, within days it was completely gone without leaving any kind of sore, or with absolutely no pain. So in a nut shell, this stuff really works. If there is any drawback to it, the odor from the oil is strong, but my wife said it was not offensive to her. What the hay if you need a mole removed and it's not one that may be cancer, give this stuff a try, it works. * - Charlie
The Staff was AWESOME!!!!! I finally found a business that knows what it takes to keep customers happy. On my first visit the staff had every thing set up and ready to go. The paper work was very easy to fill out and my wait time was less then 10 min now that alone is 5 stars compared to other places that made me wait over a hour. They gave me great service and helped with every problem I requested. Florida Skin Center is #1 in my book a customer for life.
While skin tags can appear just about anywhere, they're especially common in parts of your body that rub against clothing or skin. Skin tags are most common on the neck, armpits, groin, and eyelids. They also may appear on the chest and back and in skin creases. Women are likely to develop skin tags under the breasts, where the underwire of a bra may rub against the skin.
While it is true that skin tags often show up in the armpit or neck creases, the skin-on-skin friction is not what’s to blame. Rather, it’s the creases and skin folds that produce a friendly environment for a virus that may cause some skin tags. According to Ben Johnson, MD, founder of holistic beauty brand Osmosis Skincare, “Viruses are much more commonly spread through contact than people realize, but they don’t find the skin an easy place to survive. Creases improve their chances, and on rare occasions, one makes it into the follicle and infects local skin DNA to create skin tags.”

There are no currently medically approved creams for the removal of skin tags. Skin tags are typically removed by physical methods like cutting off or tying off with dental floss. It is not advisable to use unapproved products like Dermasil, wart removers, tea tree oil, nail polish, toothpaste, or hair-removal creams like Neet or Nair. Trial uses of unapproved creams may cause irritation and possible secondary complications.
After-care is vital to achieve excellent outcomes. Dr. Lam does not charge extra for this care but believes it is important for you to return several times throughout the year to ensure proper healing. It may be only 1 to 2 times but typically 4 to 6 times over a year about every 1 to 2 months depending on how the wound heals. Dr. Lam uses KTP laser (no downtime) to manage any raised or red scars and injectable scar dissolvers also as needed. He may also further refine the incision with dermabrasion or micro silicone injections to ultimately finesse the result, again only as needed and without charge.
While definitely the smelliest choice on this list, crushed garlic has been used for generations to treat warts and skin tags. Simply crush a large clove of garlic with a knife to release the potent oils of the garlic, and then secure with a bandage over the skin tag. Best results will come with repeated overnight applications; in the morning, wash and dry the area well.
Don’t impulsively deem any protruding bump as a skin tag; after all, there is an overwhelming number of things it could be—moles and seborrheic keratoses can closely resemble skin tags. Even worse, it could be something that requires medical treatment such as genital warts (possible indication of a sexually transmitted disease). Some growths could also be an extension of glands on the skin, and they can get infected if you’re poking at them at home. As a rule of thumb, if the tag is pigmented, see a dermatologist to get it evaluated. And here are 11 other skin mysteries you should know about.

Most importantly, don’t take it upon yourself to decide that a growth is benign. At your dermatologist’s office, you’ll have a better shot at getting a solid read on what you have—and whether it’s an issue. And if you want it removed, most doctors will perform removal by freezing with liquid nitrogen (cryosurgery), cautery with an electric current (electrosurgery), or cutting with medical scissors (snip excision).


Make a dermatologist appointment. The majority of skin tags are harmless, but it is best to talk with a dermatologist if you notice that the tag is darker than your skin color, large in size, or unusual in shape. If you remove the tag without consulting a professional you could lose valuable time in the event that it is a sign of a larger problem.[2]
Back in the 1980s, there was some speculation that skin tags were more common in people who went on to develop colon polyps or colon cancer. Subsequent research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine and the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, however, found no association. That means people with skin tags had no greater chance of developing colon polyps or cancer. The authors concluded skin tags should not be used as a reason for more intensive screening.
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