So you’ve decided that your skin tag is bothering you. As long as the tag is not infected or near a sensitive area, you can treat it yourself at home. Below, you can read about three of the best skin tag removal methods that you can try in the comfort and convenience of your own home. The fourth method is not recommended for home use, though many still attempt to try it despite its dangers.
Other skin conditions such as warts and moles can resemble skin tags. Since some moles may be cancerous, it’s best to have your skin tags examined by a doctor. Your dermatologist or family doctor will be able to diagnose skin tags. They’ll likely do this through a visual exam. If they have any doubt about the diagnosis, they may also perform a biopsy.
So far I am really happy with the Moles Formula. I have NOT been consistent with applying the oil daily to a large mole on my face. However, even with random applications (at best 3 times/week) the mole seems to be dying! I don't know much about moles, however portions have sort of scabbed over & once dry they just peel off. I am sure if I remembered to apply twice a day every day, the process would speed up a great deal. I'm extremely happy with the product so far and have no complaints, it is working, the time frame is MY fault! * - Tara
Disclaimer - These products, the information and statements contained within this web site, including any links to external sites, are designed for educational purposes only and are not intended to replace medical advice. These statements have not been assessed by the FDA. These homeopathic products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration for safety or efficacy. The FDA is not aware of scientific evidence to support homeopathy as effective. Any information provided is not intended to replace medical advice offered by a physician nor should this information be used to treat any health issues without first consulting with a physician or pediatrician. Use as instructed and if your condition persists, see your medical professional.
Aside from genetic predisposition, UV exposure causes most moles to develop. This provides you with the opportunity to minimize your risk of new moles by practicing healthy sun habits. Moles result from all UV exposure, not just from a sunburn or excessive time in the sun. To minimize the chance that sun damage will cause new moles – or skin cancer – to develop on your body use broad-spectrum sunscreen on a daily basis, and avoid indoor tanning.

I absolutely love this product... I developed many skin tags on my body as a result of two pregnancies. The dermatologist told me they were considered cosmetic and therefore wouldn't be covered by insurance. Before putting hundreds of dollars into removing them cosmetically, I decided to give tea tree oil a try. By applying this oil to my skin tags a few times a day for about two weeks, I can honestly say they are all almost completely gone. This product is a miracle worker that saved me hundreds of dollars on dermatologist fees!!!!


I have them. You might have them, too. In fact, according to a study published in the journal Dermotologica — the only one that provides hard numbers on the subject — 46 percent of 750 randomly selected people studied had them. But I was in my early twenties, and I had no idea what was going on. All I knew was that over the course of several months, a few tiny bumps had appeared — on my genitals, mostly in the fold between my thigh and pubic area. From what I could tell, they were skin-colored. They were not moles. Clearly, I had a sexually transmitted disease (STD). I thought they were warts. I Googled, and then I dearly wished I hadn’t.
I went on my way after my doctor’s appointment, relieved. But maybe I shouldn’t have been. Many doctors I've spoken to say people with obesity are more likely to get skin tags due to the increase in skin friction. I probably weighed 120 pounds (lbs) booted out in snow gear. But there are other risk factors for skin tags — factors that, if you’re suffering from them, may be worth investigating.
Lemon juice is a powerful antiseptic, and it also contains citric acid which helps to dry out skin tags by decomposing the cells. Take a half of fresh lemon and apply the juice to a cotton ball. Apply this directly to the skin tag and leave it on without washing it off. You can apply this up to three times a day and continue the routine until the skin tag falls off.
Skin tags, medically termed as acrochordons or fibroepithelial polyps (FEP), are just a tiny benign bit of flesh that is typically connected to the underlying skin by a thin stalk. Yeah, gross. On the exterior, they look like minuscule bits of “hanging” skin that are typically taller than wide. These growths are seen in approximately half of all people and can form for a variety of reasons. However, they turn up more often during pregnancy, in diabetics, obese individuals, and those that have a family history of skin tags. They are also more common as you age—and men and women suffer them at about the same rate.
Dermatologists say nay: The tags are almost never cancerous and don’t need to be removed; in fact, they’re (almost!) always benign. And while many people opt to remove them due to discomfort or for cosmetic reasons, there is no harm in leaving them be. There are extremely rare exceptions to this rule: In one study, two patients with known basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) were found to have multiple basal cell carcinomas that resembled ordinary skin tags. “There are rare cases where skin cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and even melanoma, can mimic a skin tag,” says dermatologist Avnee Shah, MD. “Going to a board-certified dermatologist assures a trained eye is examining the lesion and determining the risk of a more harmful condition masquerading as a skin tag.” To be safe, if any tag is growing, changing color, or bleeding and itching, it’s definitely time to see an expert. Find out 6 surprising signs of disease your skin can reveal.
I have only been using this product for a few days so it is a bit early to review the product (but with so many glowing reviews I an hopeful) but I would like to review the sellers. The product came very quickly but more so... when I first ordered I clicked the order button before realizing that I was supposed to enter the code generated when I entered my email in order to get a $10 discount. I immediately contacted the seller and they replied immediately that all I needed to do was send them that code. Tricky I thought, I didn't save the code. When I contacted them again they told me "no problem" and quickly sent me the refund. So 5 stars for a great buying experience. I hope I will be able to give a 5 star review on the product, but that will be later. * - Noor
Thankfully, this is far from true. While a lot of people worry that removing one will lead to more down the road, take comfort in knowing this is bogus info. Any additional breakout is because they were meant to spawn there. “One skin tag has nothing to do with another. Though removing one does not mean that you will never get another—as a doctor cannot prevent them from coming—it also does not equate to causing more to grow,” informs Dr. Shah.
If you are wanting a mole removed for cosmetic reasons, it is important you first consult with a board certified dermatologist to ensure the mole is not concerning for melanoma. Once the mole has been assessed and deemed to appear benign on clinical inspection, a discussion should be had on whether a shave removal, punch biopsy or excision would have the best cosmetic outcome.  With elevated moles a shave removal is usually performed which can leave a good cosmetic result in most cases.  For flat moles, punch biopsy or excision is usually performed, but you should have a discussion with your dermatologist on whether the scar or mole will be more cosmetically appealing.  At our office, shave removal of one mole is typically quoted at $138 to $200.  Lastly, it is important the mole be sent for pathology to a board certified dermatopathologist.  Pathology is charged separately by the dermaopathologist with prices ranging from $100 to $300.
The vast majority of skin tags are benign tumours but one study of 1,335 lesions found that four were basal cell carcinomas and one was a squamous cell carcinoma. Nevertheless, the authors suggest that the malignancy potential of skin tags is low. Patients experience few, if any, problems with skin tags although pruritus and discomfort can occur if the lesions are snagged by jewellery.
I absolutely love this product... I developed many skin tags on my body as a result of two pregnancies. The dermatologist told me they were considered cosmetic and therefore wouldn't be covered by insurance. Before putting hundreds of dollars into removing them cosmetically, I decided to give tea tree oil a try. By applying this oil to my skin tags a few times a day for about two weeks, I can honestly say they are all almost completely gone. This product is a miracle worker that saved me hundreds of dollars on dermatologist fees!!!!
Apply tea tree oil. This oil is well known for its anti-fungal properties. Get out a clean cotton ball. Dip it into clean water and then place three drops of tea tree oil onto the ball. Wash the area of the skin tag and the skin 1” around it using the cotton ball. Repeat three times a day. This is an effective way to dry up your tag as long as you are consistent with oil applications.[11]
Dr Yip notes that while it’s uncommon to experience an infected skin tag, it’s likely they may become red, inflamed and itchy if they're constantly rubbing against clothing and jewellery. “If there is infection, it is usually red, swollen and painful and may have pus discharge and a malodour [an unpleasant odour].” If this occurs, apply an antiseptic cream to mild irritations or see a dermatologist if the pain is more severe.
Researchers have noticed that people with diabetes and insulin resistance are more likely to have multiple skin tags. Obesity seems to increase the risk, too. Studies have found that the heavier people are, the more skin tags they are likely to have. That may be because skin tags are more likely to pop up in folds of skin that rub against each other.
Except for the cosmetic appearance, skin tags generally cause no physical pain or discomfort. These tiny skin growths generally cause symptoms when they are repeatedly irritated (for example, by the collar or in the groin). Cosmetic reasons are the most common reason for skin tag removal. The following symptoms and signs may necessitate skin tag removal:

There are currently five conventional skin tag treatments used by dermatologists, depending on the size, location and condition of the skin. Discuss all options thoroughly with your health care provider to determine how to get rid of skin tags that are causing you distress. Remember, as they are generally not considered a medical condition, chances are your health insurance will not cover the removal options listed here. You likely will be required to pay out-of-pocket for these procedures.


Castor oil has been a medicine cabinet staple for generations, much like baking soda. Together, they may help to safely get rid of a bothersome skin tag. Mix two parts castor oil with one part baking soda and rub it gently over the skin tag. Cover with a piece of plastic wrap, or banana or papaya peel, and secure with a bandage. Leave on overnight and rinse off in the morning. Repeat nightly until the skin tag falls off.

While you can find natural recipes for amazing skin, you’re not going to find any such thing for skin tags. As wonderful as it would be to have an FDA-approved magic lotion or potion that would help get rid of these pesky spots, it unfortunately doesn’t exist as of yet. Dr. Shah says, “This must be one of the most frequent myths I encounter! There are currently products in the pipeline that may be helpful in topically removing benign growths in the future, but nothing at this moment. So, if you’d like to get skin tags removed, it’s highly recommended to see a board-certified dermatologist to have them treated.” Here are 8 natural recipes for great skin.
Have a surgical excision if necessary. If the mole is cancerous, or if it's large and covers a big surface area, it will probably need to be removed using surgical excision. After administering local anesthesia, the dermatologist will make a deeper cut to remove the mole and surrounding tissues, preventing it from growing back. The wound is then closed using sutures designed to leave minimal scarring.[3]
Back in the 1980s, there was some speculation that skin tags were more common in people who went on to develop colon polyps or colon cancer. Subsequent research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine and the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, however, found no association. That means people with skin tags had no greater chance of developing colon polyps or cancer. The authors concluded skin tags should not be used as a reason for more intensive screening.
×