According to Live Science, a skin tag is basically just a skin growth that can be smooth or irregular. It may attach to the skin by a stalk. But Katy Burris, MD, an assistant professor of dermatology at Columbia University and board-certified dermatologist practicing at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, puts it simply: “A skin tag is a soft growth of normal skin that appears like a small tag. They tend to appear in areas of high friction, where skin may rub clothing or other skin.”
After-care is vital to achieve excellent outcomes. Dr. Lam does not charge extra for this care but believes it is important for you to return several times throughout the year to ensure proper healing. It may be only 1 to 2 times but typically 4 to 6 times over a year about every 1 to 2 months depending on how the wound heals. Dr. Lam uses KTP laser (no downtime) to manage any raised or red scars and injectable scar dissolvers also as needed. He may also further refine the incision with dermabrasion or micro silicone injections to ultimately finesse the result, again only as needed and without charge.
And here’s an interesting tidbit to know: “In typical practice, every single mole that is removed is also examined under the microscope, so often we may use the terms ‘mole removal’ and ‘biopsy’ interchangeably,” Jules Lipoff, M.D., assistant professor of dermatology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. “Even if a patient is having a mole removed ostensibly for cosmetic reasons, it is prudent to evaluate the pathology regardless,” he explains. “We wouldn’t want to miss something.”
Don’t all of us want a smooth skin with no marks or abnormalities? If your skin is smooth to the look and the touch, you will feel very content and confident, as people with skin conditions tend to feel unconfident about them. Unfortunately, some people have to suffer some of the skin conditions, and one of them is skin tags. Do you know what they are? Do you know if you have them? Are skin tags dangerous and how to get rid of skin tags?
Most moles are unnoticeable and do not require removal. Obvious moles that are dark, bumpy or just simply irritating, are the ones primarily considered for removal. Those who are conscious about how they look may consider this quick cosmetic enhancement. Healthwise, any mole that changes in appearance, must be promptly checked to ensure that it is not cancerous.
Castor oil has been a medicine cabinet staple for generations, much like baking soda. Together, they may help to safely get rid of a bothersome skin tag. Mix two parts castor oil with one part baking soda and rub it gently over the skin tag. Cover with a piece of plastic wrap, or banana or papaya peel, and secure with a bandage. Leave on overnight and rinse off in the morning. Repeat nightly until the skin tag falls off.
A skin tag, or acrochordon (pl. acrochorda), is a small benign tumor that forms primarily in areas where the skin forms creases (or rubs together), such as the neck, armpit and groin. They may also occur on the face, usually on the eyelids. Perianal skin tags can be associated with Crohn's disease.[citation needed] Acrochorda are generally harmless and painless and usually do not grow or change over time.[citation needed] Though tags up to a half-inch long have been seen,[2] they are typically the size of a grain of rice. The surface of an acrochordon may be smooth or irregular in appearance and is often raised from the surface of the skin on a fleshy stalk called a peduncle. Microscopically, an acrochordon consists of a fibrovascular core, sometimes also with fat cells, covered by an unremarkable epidermis. However, tags may become irritated by shaving, clothing, jewellery or eczema.
Dermatologists say nay: The tags are almost never cancerous and don’t need to be removed; in fact, they’re (almost!) always benign. And while many people opt to remove them due to discomfort or for cosmetic reasons, there is no harm in leaving them be. There are extremely rare exceptions to this rule: In one study, two patients with known basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) were found to have multiple basal cell carcinomas that resembled ordinary skin tags. “There are rare cases where skin cancers, such as basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and even melanoma, can mimic a skin tag,” says dermatologist Avnee Shah, MD. “Going to a board-certified dermatologist assures a trained eye is examining the lesion and determining the risk of a more harmful condition masquerading as a skin tag.” To be safe, if any tag is growing, changing color, or bleeding and itching, it’s definitely time to see an expert. Find out 6 surprising signs of disease your skin can reveal.
Been using this oil for a few weeks in a large ,non cancerous mole.I am very impressed as I can already see and feel one corner of the mile lifting .I have had other moles removed and it has been very painful with nitro and swore I would never do it again .I have since bought other products for a plantars wart and I am equally impressed. Thank you thank you thank you * - Sandra
A mole that is too large, too dark, bumpy, or is located on an area of the body that can be easily seen, may be considered for removal. Dr. Daniel Beck offers cosmetic mole removal surgery, which is a procedure to remove unattractive moles, or ones that are bothersome. While the majority of all moles are noncancerous, it is recommended that DFW area individuals who desire mole removal consult with a dermatologist first to ensure it is benign. Certain moles may require a cosmetic approach to avoid irregular lines, scarring and skin discoloration. During the initial consultation, we will discuss the best removal approach that will result in a safe and attractive result.

Determine whether a biopsy is needed. At your appointment, the doctor will examine your mole's shape, borders, size, color, and surface texture, to see whether it appears to be cancerous.[1] If the mole exhibits common symptoms of melanoma or another type of skin cancer, the doctor will order a biopsy to test whether cancer cells are present. If it doesn't, the doctor will be able to go ahead and remove the mole. The sample will often be sent for analysis even if the mole does not appear to be cancerous.


Susan Besser, MD, a family medicine specialist with Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, says that if skin tags “get large, change color, or become infected or ulcerated, you need to see your doctor. In those cases, it may not be a simple skin tag and further evaluation is needed.” By and large, Todd Minars, MD, of MINARS Dermatology in Hollywood, Florida, states, “Skin tags are harmless. If they do not bother you, then there is no need to treat them.”
Simply soak a sterile cotton ball with apple cider vinegar and secure it in place over the skin tag with a bandage for 20 minutes. Remove and check for any irritation on the skin. If no irritation is evident, you will want to do the 20-minute treatment during the day and then before bed. Apply the soaked cotton ball and secure it, and leave it on overnight.
Soft, fleshy growths that hang from the skin are commonly referred to as skin tags. Acrochordons — as they are referred to within the medical community — are not cancerous. They are generally considered a cosmetic concern, not a medical issue. They rarely cause pain or discomfort. But many people find them unsightly and want to know how to remove skin tags. (1)
And speaking of cancer, it’s generally not something you need to worry about with regular old skin tags. Dr. Farber says that, “If anything changes quickly, is unusually painful, or concerns you, it’s worth getting it examined to confirm it’s a benign skin tag …. Skin tags tend to grow very slowly. Any growth that changes quickly is a reason to get examined by a dermatologist.”
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