If you are wanting a mole removed for cosmetic reasons, it is important you first consult with a board certified dermatologist to ensure the mole is not concerning for melanoma. Once the mole has been assessed and deemed to appear benign on clinical inspection, a discussion should be had on whether a shave removal, punch biopsy or excision would have the best cosmetic outcome.  With elevated moles a shave removal is usually performed which can leave a good cosmetic result in most cases.  For flat moles, punch biopsy or excision is usually performed, but you should have a discussion with your dermatologist on whether the scar or mole will be more cosmetically appealing.  At our office, shave removal of one mole is typically quoted at $138 to $200.  Lastly, it is important the mole be sent for pathology to a board certified dermatopathologist.  Pathology is charged separately by the dermaopathologist with prices ranging from $100 to $300.
Dr Yip notes that while it’s uncommon to experience an infected skin tag, it’s likely they may become red, inflamed and itchy if they're constantly rubbing against clothing and jewellery. “If there is infection, it is usually red, swollen and painful and may have pus discharge and a malodour [an unpleasant odour].” If this occurs, apply an antiseptic cream to mild irritations or see a dermatologist if the pain is more severe.
A mole that is too large, too dark, bumpy, or is located on an area of the body that can be easily seen, may be considered for removal. Dr. Daniel Beck offers cosmetic mole removal surgery, which is a procedure to remove unattractive moles, or ones that are bothersome. While the majority of all moles are noncancerous, it is recommended that DFW area individuals who desire mole removal consult with a dermatologist first to ensure it is benign. Certain moles may require a cosmetic approach to avoid irregular lines, scarring and skin discoloration. During the initial consultation, we will discuss the best removal approach that will result in a safe and attractive result.
Tie it off. You can use fishing line, dental floss, or a thin cotton string in this method. Tie the string around the base of your skin tag. Tighten the tie until it is firm, but not painful. Snip off the excess and leave the string in place. Your skin tag should fall off due to lack of circulation. This is a version of what doctors can perform in their office using sterile tools.[24]
Made up of a group of cells referred to as melanocytes, skin moles are a common concern for many people. Although they are often harmless, some moles are cancerous and may be life threatening. Moles are usually brown, but can also be black, pink or skin colored. Typically oval or round shaped, skin moles can be flat or raised. Normal moles should not be larger than the size of a pencil eraser.
Back in the 1980s, there was some speculation that skin tags were more common in people who went on to develop colon polyps or colon cancer. Subsequent research published in the Archives of Internal Medicine and the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, however, found no association. That means people with skin tags had no greater chance of developing colon polyps or cancer. The authors concluded skin tags should not be used as a reason for more intensive screening.
Been getting rid of overgrown, strange and poorly positioned moles one by one. Works! On my neck, where there’s multiple, small moles I have used this as an all-over treatment with success, too. Still working on it, but great reductions already. Would probably be quicker if I were more consistent, but still working, just slow. (Dark moles generally turn light after a few applications). * - Theresa
Make a dermatologist appointment. The majority of skin tags are harmless, but it is best to talk with a dermatologist if you notice that the tag is darker than your skin color, large in size, or unusual in shape. If you remove the tag without consulting a professional you could lose valuable time in the event that it is a sign of a larger problem.[2]
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Skin tags [1], medically known as acrochorda, are commonly used to describe the condition of soft and non – cancerous skin outgrowth. The presence of this skin problem is not hard to be found on different parts of the body, consisting of the neck, arms, eyelids, and lower parts of the armpits and breast. A recent study has reported skin stags are quite small in size and deformed in shape. These fleshy outgrowths can emerge in both men and women.
Skin tags (acrochordons) are small, noncancerous (benign) growths that usually measure only a few millimeters in length, though they can grow up to half an inch.3 They typically appear on the neck, armpit, groin or inframammary areas.4 Almost half the population has been reported to have a skin tag, but the condition is more associated with obese people.5 Skin tags are also rare during childhood, but older people have an increased chance of developing them.6
Mole removal typically takes place in under an hour using a local anesthesia. Larger moles that are excised will require sutures. This treated area may feel a little discomfort, which typically goes away within a few days after the procedure. The skin will scab over and will completely heal within 2-3 weeks with proper application of topical medications.
But there’s an even bigger reason you should visit an expert. After dermatologists remove a growth, they’ll look at it under a microscope. “There are things that look like skin tags but are cancerous,” says Dr. Rossi. That doesn’t mean you should freak out if you do find a skin tag. Most will just be benign, but you won’t know for sure until you’ve asked. Plus, checking a skin tag is a “good excuse” to get your doctor to check the rest of your body for skin cancer and atypical or malignant growths, says Dr. Rossi. Next, read up on these things you should never, ever do to your skin.
Abnormal or unsightly moles can generally be excised in a brief and straightforward outpatient procedure performed under local anesthesia by Dr. Rapaport. Dr. Rapaport has vast experience in skin cancer treatment, particularly in the treatment of malignant melanoma. Dr. Rapaport’s experience and expertise in skin cancer treatment makes him an ideal specialist for the identification and treatment of both “normal” non-cancerous moles and “abnormal” pre-cancerous moles. Along with his knowledge of skin cancer treatment, Dr. Rapaport’s aptitude for cosmetic surgery enables him to minimize the potential of an unsightly scar formation during the mole removal.
Some doctors said skin tags wouldn’t grow. Some told me they would keep growing. Most of them said they would increase in frequency as a person ages, and sure enough, what did I find over my eyelid the other day — a tiny little skin tag, just where the lid rubs against my brow. For cosmetic reasons, I’d consider getting that one removed, though the thought of liquid nitrogen on that thin skin makes me shudder, as do the aesthetics of a giant Band-Aid on my face for days.
Those who are concerned about scarring should consider seeking out a plastic surgeon as they understand the cosmetic approach to take. This is recommended especially to those who have larger moles. A plastic surgeon will focus on minimizing scarring as much as possible. Post-surgery care is especially important to create a natural, attractive outcome.
I have them. You might have them, too. In fact, according to a study published in the journal Dermotologica — the only one that provides hard numbers on the subject — 46 percent of 750 randomly selected people studied had them. But I was in my early twenties, and I had no idea what was going on. All I knew was that over the course of several months, a few tiny bumps had appeared — on my genitals, mostly in the fold between my thigh and pubic area. From what I could tell, they were skin-colored. They were not moles. Clearly, I had a sexually transmitted disease (STD). I thought they were warts. I Googled, and then I dearly wished I hadn’t.
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