Moles, medically known as nevi (nevus, in singular), are benign conditions of the skin that can be raised or flat, pigmented or flesh colored. Mole removals should only be undertaken after considerable deliberation and thought. Since they oftentimes occur in highly conspicuous areas like the central face, the recovery following a mole removal may be several months before they are not immediately obvious to an observer that you had surgery. Mole removal techniques are graduated and adjusted depending on the type of mole, location of mole, and how unsightly it is aesthetically. Dr. Lam believes that excellent mole removal is predicated not only on superior surgery but also on meticulous and frequent follow-up care to ensure the incision heals well.

I had a horrible and ugly large size mole on my forehead along the hairline. Every time I combed my hair I would catch it and tear it. I was desperate to get it removed. After consulting a Dermatologist I knew it would be painful and high in cost and probably leave a scar. I started to investigate and found your product. When I got it my expectations were low and I had little hope. I applied it three times a day every day until the bottle was near dry. To my amazement I found that the mole was getting smaller and pealing off! Bravo to you for this life saving product. Thank you so much for making my life and appearance better.... * - Deb
Skin tags can occur almost anywhere on the body covered by skin. However, the two most common areas for skin tags are the neck and armpits. Other common body areas for the development of skin tags include the eyelids, upper chest (particularly under the female breasts), buttock folds, and groin folds. Tags are typically thought to occur where skin rubs against itself or clothing. Babies who are plump may also develop skin tags in areas where skin rubs against skin, like the sides of the neck. Younger children may develop tags at the upper eyelid areas, often in areas where they may rub their eyes. Older children and preteens may develop tags in the underarm area from friction and repetitive irritation from sports.

Although skin tags are primarily a cosmetic problem, that doesn’t mean they’re not significant enough to consult a doctor. For starters, they can still bleed when they come off, so dermatologists stress never trying to cut or pull off a skin tag on your own. One theory on skin tag removal is that tying it off with dental floss will remove it—a bad idea, according to Tanya Kormeili, MD, “This may remove the small ones, but some of the bigger ones have a larger blood supply and may become very painful as you strangulate the skin tag. They are easily removed in the office by a dermatologist.”
While skin tags can appear just about anywhere, they're especially common in parts of your body that rub against clothing or skin. Skin tags are most common on the neck, armpits, groin, and eyelids. They also may appear on the chest and back and in skin creases. Women are likely to develop skin tags under the breasts, where the underwire of a bra may rub against the skin.
Skin mole removal is advised for moles that grow too large, and for other types of dangerous moles. Moles removal is also often desired for aesthetic reasons. If you have a rough mole, an itchy mole, or some other type of bothersome mole, having it examined by a akin doctor is recommended. It is also advised to have the moles on your skin checked periodically. A dermatologist is qualified to detect any signs of abnormality or changes in moles, in order to prevent the development or spreading of melanoma. Surgical mole removal is a simple preventative procedure that can make a big difference in your health.
Congenital nevi are moles that are present at birth. Congenital nevi occur in about one in 100 people. These moles are slightly more likely to develop into melanoma (cancer) than are moles that appear after birth. A mole or freckle should be checked if it has a diameter of more than a pencil eraser or any characteristics of the ABCDEs of melanoma (see below).
Some common skin tag look-alikes include benign lesions such as seborrheic keratoses, common moles, warts, neurofibromas, and a fatty mole called nevus lipomatosus. While extremely rare, there are a few reports of skin cancers found in skin tags. Skin cancers like basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant melanoma may rarely mimic skin tags, as described above.
The cost to remove a mole is variable depending on the body location and nature of the mole. Some moles are best treated by excision with stitching. Flat moles that are not raised off the skin surface are a good example of this since trying to shave the mole could involve getting too deep into the skin and leave a "divot" or ice-pick type scar without suturing the area closed. Moles that are more raised off the skin can usually be shaved off but may also benefit from suturing to refine the scar/blemish that forms especially if on the face or other highly exposed areas. The cost will range from $200 - $350 depending on the technique used. One thing to always keep in mind is that a genuine mole should never be simply ablated, such as with laser, liquid nitrogen or radio-frequency without a biopsy being done first to ensure the mole is safe. Otherwise, an ablation type treatment may simply mask the remnants of the mole that is destined to form a melanoma.
Make a dermatologist appointment. The majority of skin tags are harmless, but it is best to talk with a dermatologist if you notice that the tag is darker than your skin color, large in size, or unusual in shape. If you remove the tag without consulting a professional you could lose valuable time in the event that it is a sign of a larger problem.[2]
Hemorrhoids (piles) are swollen veins in the rectum and anus. Causes include pregnancy, obesity, diarrhea, low-fiber diet, and prolonged sitting on the toilet. Treatment varies depending upon the severity of the hemorrhoids. Some treatment options include over-the-counter creams and suppositories, stool softeners, warm sitz baths, and hemorrhoidectomies.
According to Live Science, a skin tag is basically just a skin growth that can be smooth or irregular. It may attach to the skin by a stalk. But Katy Burris, MD, an assistant professor of dermatology at Columbia University and board-certified dermatologist practicing at Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, puts it simply: “A skin tag is a soft growth of normal skin that appears like a small tag. They tend to appear in areas of high friction, where skin may rub clothing or other skin.”
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