Skin tags, medically termed as acrochordons or fibroepithelial polyps (FEP), are just a tiny benign bit of flesh that is typically connected to the underlying skin by a thin stalk. Yeah, gross. On the exterior, they look like minuscule bits of “hanging” skin that are typically taller than wide. These growths are seen in approximately half of all people and can form for a variety of reasons. However, they turn up more often during pregnancy, in diabetics, obese individuals, and those that have a family history of skin tags. They are also more common as you age—and men and women suffer them at about the same rate.
While they can turn up anywhere, skin tags tend to appear where there is frequent friction, such as the neck, breasts, groin, and underarms. Ultimately, there is no evidence that skin tags will lead to any serious skin condition: They’re mostly an aesthetic annoyance. Regardless, most dermatologists encourage you to have them checked out—and removed, if you want. The only link to danger is from one study from the Indian Journal of Dermatology, which suggested that skin tags may be a sign of underlying heart issues. You could get your heart checked out, but the one research connection shouldn’t concern anyone too much.
We’ve already established they’re small, fleshy and odd-looking, but seriously, what are they?! “Skin tags are harmless fleshy skin-coloured growths made up of collagen fibres and blood vessels that hang off the skin, and can range from a few millimetres to a few centimetres in size,” explains Canberra-based Consultant Dermatologist and Skin Surgeon, Dr Leona Yip. She adds that you’ll most likely find skin tags - also known as acrochordons - in skin folds like your neck, armpit, under the breasts and around the groin. “These are areas that are prone to skin friction where the opposing sides of skin rubs against each other.” They can also form along the lash line of the eyelid.
But that doesn’t mean you should completely ignore skin tags. David Lorschter, MD, founder of Curology and a board-certified dermatologist in San Diego, notes there are exceptions. He says people with a genetic disorder called basal cell nevus system (BCNS) usually exhibit spots of basal cell skin cancer that look like — you guessed it — skin tags. Therefore, people with BCNS should have their skin tags biopsied and screened for cancer on a regular basis.

Dr. Shiel received a Bachelor of Science degree with honors from the University of Notre Dame. There he was involved in research in radiation biology and received the Huisking Scholarship. After graduating from St. Louis University School of Medicine, he completed his Internal Medicine residency and Rheumatology fellowship at the University of California, Irvine. He is board-certified in Internal Medicine and Rheumatology.


Moles can be removed a number of ways, most commonly by numbing the area and then shaving them off or cutting them out and closing the area with stiches. The method of removal is determined by a number of factors including appearance, size, location, and type of mole. For example, if a mole is just bothersome because it is raised, shaving it flat is usually the best approach. Similarly, if a mole is abnormal appearing and small, it also is typically shaved. Conversely, moles that are growing irritated hairs are usually best treated with complete removal and closure with stiches. Moles can grow back after shaving (and occasionally even after removing and closing area with stiches).
Essential oils contain anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties that may help remove skin tags naturally. One solution that's becoming popular is the use of tea tree oil, which is a potent product derived from the Melaleuca alternifolia tree from Australia.19 This plant has been studied extensively, with research pointing out that it can help fight bacteria,20 fungi21 and viruses.22 Furthermore, other experts note that tea tree oil contains anti-inflammatory properties.23,24,25
Some doctors said skin tags wouldn’t grow. Some told me they would keep growing. Most of them said they would increase in frequency as a person ages, and sure enough, what did I find over my eyelid the other day — a tiny little skin tag, just where the lid rubs against my brow. For cosmetic reasons, I’d consider getting that one removed, though the thought of liquid nitrogen on that thin skin makes me shudder, as do the aesthetics of a giant Band-Aid on my face for days.
While the majority of skin tags are simply destroyed, sometimes tissue is sent for microscopic exam by a health care specialist known as a pathologist, who will determine the exact diagnosis and determine whether an abnormality such as skin cancer is present. Irregular skin growths that are larger, bleed, or have an unusual presentation may require pathology examination to make sure there are no irregular cells or skin cancers.
Moles, medically known as nevi (nevus, in singular), are benign conditions of the skin that can be raised or flat, pigmented or flesh colored. Mole removals should only be undertaken after considerable deliberation and thought. Since they oftentimes occur in highly conspicuous areas like the central face, the recovery following a mole removal may be several months before they are not immediately obvious to an observer that you had surgery. Mole removal techniques are graduated and adjusted depending on the type of mole, location of mole, and how unsightly it is aesthetically. Dr. Lam believes that excellent mole removal is predicated not only on superior surgery but also on meticulous and frequent follow-up care to ensure the incision heals well.
The causes of skin tags are not entirely clear but their presence in skin fold areas suggests that friction or frequent irritation is a potential cause. The condition appears to have a genetic component (there is a tendency for skin tags to occur in families) but other potential causes include hormonal imbalances. For example, skin tags are associated with agromegaly, the growth hormone disorder.
Skin tags themselves have a core of fibers and ducts, nerve cells, fat cells and a layer of skin surrounding it. They may have a stalk and generally look like a small piece of hanging skin. Skin tags may have a smooth surface or an irregular surface. They are often raised and either slightly brown or flesh colored. They generally start quite small and flat, like the bump on a pinhead. Sizes vary, and they can grow up to 5 cm in size. (2)
Nope: Don’t cringe away from your friends or family affected with skin tags; they pose no threat to you whatsoever. Even though some skin tags may be caused by a virus (HPV), once the virus has embedded itself, it’s not going anywhere. “Viruses land on your skin all the time and the virus itself is minimally contagious because the skin is not a great habitat on its own,” notes Dr. Johnson. “It takes a special environment to give the virus a chance to infect our skin cell DNA. Once it has survived and embedded itself, the skin keeps it isolated so that the only result is the skin tag itself.” Here are the 37 worst pieces of advice dermatologists have heard.
If you are wanting a mole removed for cosmetic reasons, it is important you first consult with a board certified dermatologist to ensure the mole is not concerning for melanoma. Once the mole has been assessed and deemed to appear benign on clinical inspection, a discussion should be had on whether a shave removal, punch biopsy or excision would have the best cosmetic outcome.  With elevated moles a shave removal is usually performed which can leave a good cosmetic result in most cases.  For flat moles, punch biopsy or excision is usually performed, but you should have a discussion with your dermatologist on whether the scar or mole will be more cosmetically appealing.  At our office, shave removal of one mole is typically quoted at $138 to $200.  Lastly, it is important the mole be sent for pathology to a board certified dermatopathologist.  Pathology is charged separately by the dermaopathologist with prices ranging from $100 to $300.

Most people choose to remove them for cosmetic reasons, especially skin tags that surface on the neck, eyelid, or face. In rare cases, a skin tag can get irritated and infected. In that case, skin tag removal is the best course of action to prevent infection from reoccurring. But, what causes them? And once you have them, you need to know how to get rid of skin tags. We’ll explain it all.


"If the skin tags are a little bigger or they have more of a thicker stalk at the bottom, then I like to just do a miniature injection of lidocaine to numb the skin and just snip them right off with some very sharp sterile scissors. It only takes a second to do," says Geraghty. "Even with that method I usually do a little bit of cautery after to burn the base because these skin tags have their own blood vessel supply. Burning the base also puts a little scab on it."
I came across Amoils by accident while searching for something on Google. I was EXTREMELY skeptical; therefore, I was reluctant to try ANY of the products until I began reading the reviews, which lead me to check out the ingredients listed. Long story short, I prayed about it, and decided to give it a try, and I am SO VERY GRATEFUL I DID! My mind was further soothed upon review of Amoils BBB A+ rating. I received my products quickly and began using them immediately, following all instructions exactly as directed, and OMG, OMG, OMG, THEY WORK, THEY REALLY, REALLY WORKED!!! Within 2-3 days, moles were literally shrinking, and completely disappearing! Disappearing!!! IT WORKS!!! My Mom and sister are witnesses, and now, I'm back excited to place yet another order for other products for them to try. I couldn't be more satisfied!!! * - Tori
Mole removal typically takes place in under an hour using a local anesthesia. Larger moles that are excised will require sutures. This treated area may feel a little discomfort, which typically goes away within a few days after the procedure. The skin will scab over and will completely heal within 2-3 weeks with proper application of topical medications.

Someone should have told me all this and urged me to get my blood sugar checked immediately. A standard physical a few years later (I wasn’t doing them regularly like I should have been; I was young and stupid) in fact revealed that my fasting blood sugar levels were high. The skin tags could have been a clue. A study published in March 2017 in the journal Dermatology Review found that nearly 42 percent of patients with skin tags fulfilled the criteria for metabolic disease. About 37 percent of the participants had abnormally high glucose tolerance tests.
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